Some thoughts from a teacher in the early stages of her career. Inspired by all the great edubloggers out there!

Archive for April, 2014

Blogs for the Week Ending 27th April 2014

The Echo Chamber

This is round up of the best education blogs from the last week (apologies for the slight delay due to technical difficulties). If you are an education blogger on WordPress, please reblog this post. There is (as far as I know) no Chalk Talk Podcast this week, but I would still like to choose the blogpost of the week some time soon. Any suggestions gratefully received either in the comments below, or on twitter, directed to @oldandrewuk

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Now! That’s Primary Blogging Volume Twelve

prawnseyeblog

The first volume of the new term- not exhaustive but a range of primary and primary-related posts from the last few weeks. If you have any blogs that you would like included for future volumes please tweet them with the #NowPrimary.

1. To plan or not to plan, via @LeadingLearner: http://t.co/LlZ9Ny8DZW

2. Learning walls, via @StephenConnor7: http://t.co/iz5cVgV8lO

3. Email for FS and KS1, via @mr_macmac: http://t.co/MuGAgWuyGQ

4. New curriculm booklet, via @michaelt1979: http://t.co/cnbk05BsQK

5. Who are the children in your classroom, via @ChrisChivers2: http://t.co/traLr317xe

6. THe problem with FFT, via @IcingOnCakeBlog: http://t.co/fGclt3Ws3s

7. Emergent writing, via @nurserynook: http://t.co/vq6BFpE3tF

8. MFL in the new primary curriculm, via @jowinchester: https://t.co/MMljmCtmKV

9. Testing times, courtesy of @nancygedge: http://t.co/RA2NLnwxZs

10. What goes on behind a Head’s closed door? Courtesy of @jillberry106: http://t.co/x912Cxl1GQ

11. Honesty in education, via @PrimaryHead1: http://t.co/f8dsn0Bk0Q

12. Using computer games as a prompt for writing, via @FarrowMr: http://t.co/hvaUkwdqKK

13. Cabinet making…

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High expectations-S.L.A.N.T with the boys

I’ve not heard of slant before so I think I will give this a try

From the Sandpit...

“Low-level disruption is like kryptonite for the well-planned lesson. It’s like a woodpecker boring a hole in your head with a toffee hammer while wearing a Pete Doherty mask. It’s that annoying. And it’s that insidious.  By itself, it is disrespectful and distracting. Left unattended, it erodes the sharp edges of your lessons like a river rubs a path through a mountain, grain by grain. It’s the thin end of the wedge. Why so serious? Because low-level disruption is what pupils do instead of learning. It’s a classic diversionary tactic where the sole function, by intelligent design or dumb malice, is to turn your lesson from a symphony to a cats’ chorus.”  Tom Bennett

I’m a huge Doug Lemov fan and have recently purchased the follow up to Teach like a Champion, the Teach like a champion field guide. This also coincides with a few changes to our KS3…

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Blogs for the Week Ending 20th April 2014

The Echo Chamber

This is round up of the best education blogs from the last week. If you are an education blogger on WordPress, please reblog this post. There is (as far as I know) no  Chalk Talk Podcast  this week, but I would still like to choose the blogpost of the week some time tomorrow. Any suggestions gratefully received either in the comments below, or on twitter, directed to  @oldandrewuk

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Blogs for the Week Ending 13th April 2014

The Echo Chamber

This is round up of the best education blogs from the last week. If you are an education blogger on WordPress, please reblog this post. There is no  Chalk Talk Podcast  this week, but I would still like to choose the blogpost of the week some time tomorrow. Any suggestions gratefully received either in the comments below, or on twitter, directed to  @oldandrewuk

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We go to learn NOT teach.

Excellent, I wish my school would do this

Chris Moyse

There has been much debate in recent months about lesson observations and whether or not we should judge them. It would seem that many schools are now ‘seeing the light’ and thankfully deciding that this is a flawed and unnecessary practice.
At Bridgwater College Academy we have not judged lessons for four years now and have tried to develop a system and culture that support the development of our teaching staff. This is, of course, still a work in progress and this post outlines the process that builds upon what we have done in the last few years and will be in place next academic year at our academy.
As one way of improving outcomes for our students we will continue to improve teacher quality and to do that we will improve professional development. The vision and approach I have for professional development at BCA is that there is an…

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Throwing out that old RUCSAC

A very interesting take on maths word problems

This is my classroom

Experts, say Hattie and Yates, see and represent problems on a deeper level, whereas novices focus on superficial aspects. With this in mind, take a closer look at one of the most prevalent strategies for solving problems:

20140331-200847.jpg

In some variants of the acronym, the U even stands for ‘understand the problem’! If children practise solving problems in this way, they can only get better at analysing the superficial structures of the problems. Some of the advice leads children to develop near useless strategies when problems get trickier. At its worst, I’ve seen (and probably set up myself) lessons where children are told that they are doing subtraction word problems. Every problem has the same sort of language pattern and children could feasibly get by simply by picking the numbers out and subtracting one from the other.

Take the ‘underline’ and ‘choose which calculation’ advice. Underlining key words may well be…

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